F.A.C.E. IT! Now is the time for students to start building a fiscally responsible future. 

Race for f.a.c.e. June 11, 2017! Help support financial literacy and join the run at www.raceforface.org!


By the time they reach their senior year, 56 percent of college students carry four or more credit cards, with an average balance of $2,864. 

(Washington Post, 2007)

9 in 10 undergraduates reported paying for direct education expenses with credit cards—and the average amount they charged more than doubled since the last study. 

(Sallie Mae’s National Study of Usage Rates and Trends 2009)

More than 9 in 10 adults and students believe it is important for the people of the United States to have a good understanding of economics. However, only half of high school students say they ever have been taught economics in school. 

(National Council on Economic Education, 2003)

The average 21-year-old in the U.S. will spend more than 2.2 million in their lifetime.


In this time of credit crunch and economic downturn, college students are relying on credit cards more than ever before. Nearly every indicator measured in spring 2008 showed an increase in credit card usage since the last study was conducted in fall 2004. 

(Sallie Mae’s National Study of Usage Rates and Trends 2009)

Overall average workers between the ages of 25 to 34 must spend 25 cents on every dollar earned on debt repayments. 

(“Strapped: Why America's 20 and 30 Somethings Can't Get Ahead", Tamara Draut, 2006)

45% of college students are in credit card debt, the average credit card debt being more than $3,000. 

(Jump$tart Coalition, 2005)

The number of 18 to 24-year-olds declaring bankruptcy has increased 96% in 10 years. 

(Richmond Credit Abuse Resistant Education (CARE) Program)

More schools are requiring standalone courses in personal finance for graduation than in 2007; however, the total is still well under 10% of the Pennsylvania's 500 school districts. 

(Pennsylvania Office of Financial Education: 2009 Survey)

Nearly 15% of schools report not offering any courses in personal finance--either as a standalone or as part of another course.

(Pennsylvania Office of Financial Education: 2009 Survey)